feet

This topic contains 12 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  moominhater 12 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #61514

    kizkiznobite
    Member

    Canines have very tough feet think about snow dogs, foxes wolves etc.  They have special blood vessels that keep footpads just above the freezing point – this is why it is important for the likes of me to trim the fur close to the pads under the feet of my lot in winter – to stop ice balls from getting trapped and therefore making it easier for the blood vessels to exchange heat into the pads themselves rather than the heat being wasted in trying to melt trapped ice balls.

    Dogs curl up for a reason – the snow dogs for example will curl up with their tails around their noses and feet – so that the warm air exhaled by their lungs will keep the feet warm.

    Many modern domestic dogs have very little hair on their feet but they have adapted their inheritance from their ancestors and have fatty pads with real tough skin. These pads are comprised of fat (those of you that have had to deal with badly cut pads will be aware of the pale colour of the flesh – this is the fat content) and thick tissue – they act as both shock absorbers to protect foot bones and they help to keep out the cold – especially the carpal pad – the biggy on the back of dogs’ front legs – a couple inches up from the foot, the skin over the foot pads is the toughest on the dog’s entire body.

    When dogs’ normal body temperature (101.5 degrees to 102.5 degrees) drops due to cold they shiver to increase muscle activity – but – and this is the real clever bit – they also withdraw some of their circulation from the extremities to the internal organs and the veins and blood vessels as mentioned above have heat exchangers – carrying cold blood back from the feet to the heart – this passes right next to arteries – goes through the heart where it increases in temperature then carries the warm oxygenated blood back to the feet.   

    Therefore (nearly finished folk but I find feet fascinating so hope you not too bored yet) feet are supplied with oxygen and nutrients in cooler blood than the rest of the body uses – hence cool feet 

    Also the feet will operate at lower temperatures because the fat is very different from the rest of the body’s fat – it has a higher melting point and a lower freezing point – hence again why dogs have cold feet    And what is more……….the same principle works backwards in the hot summer months and helps stop the body from overheating – now isnt that clever  – i have ‘coolthefeet’ on cue – they stand in cool water – puddles etc in the summer when it’s hot – this way i can cool their whole bodies down  🙂

    This is why dogs don’t need boots to keep the feet warm 

    As long as the pads are not cracked or spongy or showing any odd signs of ill health – your wee lad is fine 

    good question mechi – thank you 

    wehavehobbitfeet  😀 amilou

    #93739

    toppy
    Member

    That was a great read thank you kiz, i’d never though about how important feet were to be honest, well not indepth like that anyway!

    [quote author=kizkiznobite link=topic=6469.msg112984#msg112984 date=1169295414]
    When dogs’ normal body temperature (101.5 degrees to 102.5 degrees) drops due to cold they shiver to increase muscle activity – but – and this is the real clever bit – they also withdraw some of their circulation from the extremities to the internal organs and the veins and blood vessels as mentioned above have heat exchangers – carrying cold blood back from the feet to the heart – this passes right next to arteries – goes through the heart where it increases in temperature then carries the warm oxygenated blood back to the feet.  
    [/quote]

    This bit was really interesting!! totally amazing how there bodies work! ^ ^

    [quote author=kizkiznobite link=topic=6469.msg112984#msg112984 date=1169295414]
    Also the feet will operate at lower temperatures because the fat is very different from the rest of the body’s fat – it has a higher melting point and a lower freezing point – hence again why dogs have cold feet    And what is more……….the same principle works backwards in the hot summer months and helps stop the body from overheating – now isnt that clever 
    [/quote]

    Has it ever been known for this not to work though??  :-\ or what would happen if the dogs body didnt do this? (cant believe how interested i am over dogs feet now  😀 )

    #93740

    *Nat*
    Member

    That’s really interesting, thanks Bev  🙂 Fascinaing stuff!

    #93741

    Anonymous

    wow!! how amazing our their bodies 😛 thanks kiz  ;D

    #93742

    kizkiznobite
    Member

    if it didnt happen there would be something seriously wrong with their cardio vascular system  🙂

    #93743

    [quote author=kizkiznobite link=topic=6469.msg112984#msg112984 date=1169295414]
    As long as the pads are not cracked or spongy or showing any odd signs of ill health – your wee lad is fine 
    [/quote]

    Does this include torn? Jake tore one of his pads yesterday after our long walk.. There’s no blood and I don’t think he’s in pain and he’s not limping, he’s just spent all last night & this morning licking it.. Breaking only to have his brekkie!

    Sheesh I feel like a tit posting this as this thread is so old, I just thought it’d be a bit stupid starting a new thread..

    #93744

    kizkiznobite
    Member

    no probs – it what stickies are for

    just keep an eye on it – pads are tough but they do get infected – treat topically – i use witchazel with calamine for this as they hate the taste whereas they love aloe vera
    ::)

    #93745

    Ah thanks Bev!  :-* Don’t know what we’d do without you sometimes!

    Should I just dab it on as is or dilute?.. Come to think of it, can you dilute witchhazel  ???

    #93746

    kizkiznobite
    Member

    the witchand cal i buy from llyods chemist is a paste – a gunk

    #93747

    Thank you!  :-*

    #93748

    labattsbaby
    Member

    Great reading Kiz ;D

    Some wise man invented shoes for dogs and clothes but I heard with the clothing, some do need it. But it sure was great reading, thanks ;D

    #93749

    bisto
    Member

    Wow that was interesting reading that ty xx

    #93750

    moominhater
    Member

    Very good reading.  Thanks Kiz. 

    Joe has cut his paws twice and shredded all four of his paws in one go on hot tarmac when he was playing football with the lads at the local pub.  Didn’t realise he’s done it until he stopped for a rest and then couldn’t move again afterwards – we had to carry him everywhere for about three days even if he needed the loo.  We carried him out to the grass plonked him down and then carried him back to his bed.  He took layers of flesh of all four pads.  I’m a lot wiser now and make him rest.  Typical Collie – wants to keep going.

    Liz & Joe
    xXx

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.