How to become a dog trainer

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This topic contains 109 replies, has 30 voices, and was last updated by  waller540 8 years ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 110 total)
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  • #76975

    Jax
    Member

    [quote author=kizkiznobite link=topic=965.msg110036#msg110036 date=1168363822]
    with your basic classes that you do now – what operant methods do you use? and how do you assess the puppies that are turning classical to operant?[/quote] I don’t even know what that means lol – I do old fashioned heelwork training, basic sits, down, stand stays, recall – things like that. There is absolutely nothing else available here. We don’t have any problem dogs in the class so I guess I’ve been lucky so far. Thats why I want to learn more.

    [quote author=kizkiznobite link=topic=965.msg110036#msg110036 date=1168363822]i can offer you guides and science of learning info and training record procedures etc and will do so willingly but you do need the dogs to apply it all to[/quote] That sounds fab! Thank you!  ;D

    [quote author=parker link=topic=965.msg110037#msg110037 date=1168363867]
    if there is no one else for these others to learn from then why not be the best you can be and learn it all ;)[/quote] My sentiments exactly!  ;D Jax

    #76976

    Jax
    Member

    ps there are no puppies in the class (my English Shepherd is the youngest – and the most obedient – at 7 months) – just lots of fluffy little white things that are mummys babies and I’m trying my best to educate them to dog psychology (and fighting a losing battle with some  ???) and helping them to have well mannered dogs. Jax

    #76977

    kizkiznobite
    Member

    mmm well – teaching dog psychology without knowing the basics is bound to be hard so if you want to start at the beginning pm me requesting stuff and i will send you classical and operant basics

    #76978

    Jax
    Member

    Just teaching them that dogs are not children and should not be treated as so is difficult enough when most people in the class are wealthy bored housewives!  😉 I’d be grateful for any info!  ;D Jax

    #76979

    kizkiznobite
    Member

    info sent  🙂

    #76980

    justpetdogs
    Member

    [quote author=kizkiznobite link=topic=965.msg110020#msg110020 date=1168360955]
    and… i am mentoring both gracie and donna….interesting the different questions and the different ‘i am stuck’ points  ;D quite fascinating really  🙂

    it’s ok marion – guiding not telling  🙂
    [/quote]

    No problem, Kiz…we encourage our students to widen their learning base by talking to, watching and working with other trainers…there’s always something new to learn  ;D and a different perspective can suddenly turn the lightbulb on!

    #76981

    denisemcleod
    Member

    Well firstly I’d recommend a sanity test!  😉

    OBSERVATION, OBSERVATION, OBSERVATION!!!!!!

    Watch every dog and situation you can. Go watch a sheep dog demonstration, agility, obedience and working trials. Watch other animals too. Study a flock of sheep, herd of cows or a bunch of birds and you will learn masses about animal behaviour in general. 

    Train your own dog to do as many things as possible…..

    Then Id recommend you find a great club, train there and then if you like the instruction and it works, ask if you can help out.

    I have a full time dog training business and all of my current (8) instructors are ex customers who where good at training, have shown aptitude toward training people (becasue usually that is what it is all about) and have had the ‘balls’ to ask if they can help out. ‘Balls’ is important if you are to deal with loads of people. The personality is absolutly vital. 

    As a result I have a fantastic team. We keep up to date on developing training techniques, we recommend books to one another and we recommend and attend other peoples courses.

    No matter how much you ever know, there is someone who will know more. Seek them out and watch them, train with them, attend their courses, read their books or watch their videos.

    I have taken learning from and can recommend the following, Mary Ray, Karen Pryor, John Rogerson, Peter Neville, Ian Dunbar, Thomas Longton, Barbara Sykes, Neil Short and others.

    If you liove near Nottingham get in touch, you are welcome at our sessions. http://www.cadelac.co.uk

    Good Luck,

    Denise

     

    #76982

    kizkiznobite
    Member

    hi and welcome  🙂

    #76983

    denisemcleod
    Member

    Hi, THanks for the welcome. Looks a very interesting and informative site. Im not too good as using it though! How come everyone has fancy pics and I dont. And how come I suddenly can’t spel!  🙂
    Thanks again for the welcome

    #76984

    denisemcleod
    Member

    Ok. I’ve read a few more of the replies and this is for the attention of Kiz, can I call you kiz?

    I totally agree with you on the subject of canine behaviour and psychology courses. I am currently operating in an area where a number of people have been on them. They are now working as bewhaviourists in this area and I too spend time picking up their pieces.

    I have recently heard of A dog/owner agression case where the ‘qualified’ behaviourist had ‘resolved’ the problem over the phone in 10 minutes without meeting either dog or owner. The owner has since been bitten several times, and the dog has now been destroyed.

    Anyone interested in dog training please hear these comments. You can only learn how to train a dog by being taught, by a dog! Dogs are always the best teachers. And the more dog teachers you have the better a trainer you will be. Animals have a language of their oiwn. If you listen and watch carfeully you can pick it up. Some people do so intuitively, but others can be taught. 

    Courses can provide a lot of techinical jargon to use and also a lot of really useful information and case studies. But you have to get in there with the dogs to really find out where it’s all at.

    Watch dogs, walk dogs, train dogs, watch other people train their dogs, watch the good and the bad and spot the difference.

    OBSERVATION! OBSERVATION! OBSERVATION!

    #76985

    kizkiznobite
    Member

    ;D yes you can call me kiz

    #76986

    Anonymous

    Hi and welcome enjoyed reading your post ;D I often sit and watch my dogs interacting and writing snippets down, teaches you loads thats why I think you need to have the hands on experience when trying to become a trainer or behaviourist rather than just a course with words and books ;D

    ps agree with the personalitly bit and having balls too I need to grow some if I ever want to do anything about become a trainer 😀

    #76987

    denisemcleod
    Member

    :)Balls.

    Well Im managing without. Good job too, becasue my youngest dog keeps running off with mine and she left it in a muddy ditch – utterly inaccesible today. She was tired of chasing ball it seems.

    Thanks for your comments

    #76988

    Anonymous

    Looking for some advice: I run a pet-care business and am thinking of branching out into doing training classes, as there are none around here and would love to be able to train dogs (people!) I am going to go on a course provided by head office (it’s a franchise – they organise the course so I’m not sure which one it’s going to be) but the thing I’m a little worried about… ME. I’m too quiet! I’ll happily run around a field with a pack of dogs being silly and generally making a fool of myself, but when it comes to talking to people I’m very shy, and all the trainers I’ve met in the past are generally confident, outgoing people. I understand that it’s probably something that comes with experience of knowing what you’re talking about, but I was wondering if anyone had any confidence tips?

    #76989

    kizkiznobite
    Member

    what does the course involve – how long for etc and do you take your own dogs

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 110 total)

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