Nature’s Harvest

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This topic contains 72 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  SuzAndTheDiva 11 years, 4 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 73 total)
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  • #80957

    Anonymous

    see whats easiest to get hold off

    #80958

    Mr Doo
    Member

    oh, so they are all about on the same par, just personal preference? Okey dokey

    #80959

    i saw this in P@H and it sounded great….except the salmon oil, it has glucosomine and omega in there which is good…didn’t check measurements of them though…shame about the oil.

    #80960

    Gracie
    Member

    thought id just stick in here – rather than start new topic,, we bought this as saw at pets at home so thought would try, gave her 1/2 packet the other day, and have now read re the salmon oil  ::) her eyes have looked a touch redder than normal so wonder if this is the oil and given the fact her reaction as linked to earlier in this post think i will chuck it out!

    #80961

    Think it was Natures Menu (the ones in the foil packet) that used to give Murph the runs  ???

    I personally won’t give my two anything that mentions derivatives in the ingredients!!!  Basically it’s stuff not for for human consumption like what’s swept off the floor etc…

    #80962

    fesses
    Member

    I don’t understand KizKizobites posts for the most part. We are takling about salmon oil in the nature’s harvest food, not smoked salmon.

    #80963

    Mudgie
    Member

    will make this easy for you  ;D

    two red food dyes are used to colour the flesh of farmed salmon, canthaxanthin and astaxanthin – these are naturally occurring carotenoids. Salmon get these from their food of shrimps, krill etc this makes them nice and pink.

    but when salmon are farmed and not fed naturally their flesh is and pale and the food manufactures think it is unappealing to consumers so – canthaxanthin and astaxanthin in a biochemical form as beta carotene are both are added to the feed of farmed salmon – this combined with chemical smoking additives makes it even more risky and many people as well as most dogs react to man made beta carotene

    so whether smoked salmon or not – food dye is added to make the colour more appealing to humans – it is not good for doggies – they can get allergic reactions to it

    #80964

    Sweetypye
    Member

    synthetic beta carotene is in a lot of products and in such quantities that do not need to be labelled, therefore this risk is not unique to salmon oil,

    #80965

    fesses
    Member

    I have asked the manufacter the question as posed and this is the response. Can you all note that the salmon they use is NOT SMOKED.

    The salmon oil we use is the highest quality food-grade Scottish salmon oil available. I do know its farmed salmon, purely because it’s impossible to have a consistent high quality supply of wild salmon oil and I would have ethical concerns about depleting the wild population of salmon for a commercial product.

    People understandably want to know what the salmon are fed on, although like any other branch of the food industry it is heavily regulated as to what is permitted or not. Astaxanthin and canthaxanthin are included in salmon food to make the flesh pinker, but despite the scary-sounding long ‘scientific’ name these are not ‘dyes’, but pigments widely found in nature (i.e. the same type of thing which makes carrots orange) and which are actually considered nutrients rather than anything ‘dodgy’. For instance canthaxanthin has some very nice anti-oxidant properties, in the same vein as Vit.E. Just because they’re made artificially doesn’t make it harmful; anymore than vitamin C made by a chemical company is harmful compared to the ‘natural’ version.

    Despite my best efforts, I can’t find any research or papers which suggest that there is any suggestion that these pigments can harm dogs or humans, although there is some evidence that when salmon is smoked (which our isn’t) the combination of astaxanthin and smoke can results in products which some dogs are sensitive to.

    From the thousands of tonnes of Nature’s Harvest we’ve sold since it was launched 18 months ago I can honestly say I haven’t had anyone tell me that their dog has reacted to ‘something’ in the food.

    I do hope this is of some help. Please get back to me if you have any further concerns and I will do my best to answer them.

    #80966

    fesses
    Member

    Thanks Mudgie. I’m afraid sarcasm never comes over well on forum etc. ;D It’s not a question of making it easy for me to understand. I was highlghting the anomolies re smoked and non smoked salmon.

    #80967

    kizkiznobite
    Member

    uhuh
    so you are a seller of this yes? or the nutritionist?

    ok – lets start at the top

    anitbiotics?
    does the food contain K3?

    For instance canthaxanthin has some very nice anti-oxidant properties, in the same vein as Vit.E. Just because they’re made artificially doesn’t make it harmful; anymore than vitamin C made by a chemical company is harmful compared to the ‘natural’ version.

    really?  😉

    #80968

    Sweetypye
    Member

    It is hard to find any food raw or processed that does not contain protein which has been treated with ABs during its life.

    The toxicity of menadione (K3) [part of the Vitamin K group] has yet to be quantified as animal studies so far have been inadequate to extrapolate any meaningful data from it to demonstrate the real v imagined risks posed to pet by this hazard; in other words we as yet do not know if the hazard is trivial, moderate, significant, substantial or intolerable.

    It also depends on its synergy with the other antioxidants in the diet

    Synthetic versions of most vitamins are added to human and pet food grade food as it is cheaper than natural; it does not have the same bioavaiability as natural however its quality level is more easily measured.

    #80969

    kizkiznobite
    Member
    #80970

    kizkiznobite
    Member

    and as it not a top five – it rarely declared – as in luaths for example

    #80971

    Sweetypye
    Member

    There are lots of items in foods that are not declared on the label as legally it is not required; that is not the fault of the manufacturers per se but the legislation.

    Nothing in life is risk free.

    The dog food project site is American and lots of its “claims” have no substance in fact particu1rly in relation to some of the ingredients they appear to consider dangerous!

    There will be side effects to EVERYTHING in some cases and there are contra indications for EVERYTHING as EVERYTHING in excess is toxic, including water.

    So I am afraid the menadione one would come right down the list of hazards if I was eliminating them;

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